Save the Mongolian Wild Ass (Khulan)

in partnership with local rangers and communities

About

The Mongolian Wild Ass or Mongolian Khulan in mongolian (Equus hemionus hemionus), which is one the 5 recognized sub-species of the Asiatic Wild Ass, and for which it actually represents the largest population of this species in the world, is threatened of extinction.  

Its population is now mainly concentrated in the south of Mongolia (Gobi desert) with small populations in north of China (Xinjiang province and Inner Mongolia).

Then, Mongolia represents a very important place for the conservation of the whole species.

The population of the Mongolian Khulan has known an important decrease of about 50% since the end of the 1990’s.  

The Asiatic Wild Ass, and its sub-species, is listed in the IUCN Red List as Endangered (http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/7951/0).

The Mongolian Khulan/Mongolian Wild Ass is listed in Appendix I of the CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) and in Appendix II of the CMS (Convention on Migratory Species).

Threats actually affecting this sub-species survival are:

a) Habitat fragmentation,

b) Illegal hunting and trade for its meat (some organs seem to be also used in the traditional medicine),

c) Competition with domestic livestock to access to natural resources (water and pastures) that are limited in the Gobi desert,

d) “Conflicts” between herders and wild khulans due to a misunderstanding of this species ecology by herders. 

 

While the Mongolian Khulan is endangered and internationally protected, this animal is still internationally not well known (even locally, still being in the shadow of the famous Przewalski’s horse ...).

But research and actions are urgently needed to protect this sub-species and avoid any more decrease of its population size!  

 

The Association GOVIIN KHULAN's aims are:

- to enhance protection of the Mongolian Khulan and its habitat in partnership with local rangers and communities,

- to improve relations between humans and khulans,

- to directly involve rangers and the local population in our project to protect this sub-species and its habitat and make local people citizen conservationists,

- provide local rangers, citizen conservationists and Buddhist monkswith technical, material and professional support, as well as to employ some rangers at full-time and at part-time all year round,

- to inform, raise public awareness, and educate young generations in Mongolia, local and international citizens to protect wild species and environment, and to better manage natural resources. In the southeast Gobi some of these actions are conducted in partnership with schools and Buddhist monasteries,

- reinforce links between Mongolian culture and traditions with protection of the Mongolian Khulan, other wild species and environment,

- as well as to develop new economic opportunities in alternative of illegal hunting and trade and to motivate local communities to take much car about their environment on a long term. 

 

And then help "reach a better harmony between nature, animals and humans". 

 

The multidisciplinary approach of our project will secure its long term success.

 

Our actions are mainly conducted in the southeast Gobi, in Mongolia (east of the Umnugobi and south of the Dornogobi aimags/provinces), where there were less actions towards this species protection. Some actions (education and information) are also conducted in Ulaanbaatar (capital city of Mongolia).

Since the beginning, we collaborate with local scientists and specialists, local authorities, rangers, governors of each administrative subdivision, schools, Buddhist monasteries and the local population of our study area.
 

Since the beginning we have secured support from some local rangers, local governments, some schools, two Buddhist monasteries and the local community of the south of the Dornogobi aimag/province.

 

Local people involvement and local collaborations are both vital for an optimal approach for this project and its long term success.

 

To know more about our organization, the Mongolian khulan and our actions, feel free to visit our website here: http://www.goviin-khulan.com

 

You can also join our Facebook page here:

https://www.facebook.com/Association.GOVIIN.KHULAN

About the project owner

The association GOVIIN KHULAN is an international non-profit organization based in France. 

It is the first and actually the only NGO in Mongolia principally dedicated to the endangered Mongolian Khulan / Mongolian Wild Ass (Equus hemionus hemionus) protection, with actions focused in the southeast Gobi.

  

This organization has been founded in November 2007 by Anne-Camille SOURIS, ethologist, who is studying Mongolian wild Equids in Mongolia since 2003. Because of the lack of research and actions conducted before on the Mongolian Khulan, she decided to get specialized on this sub-species and to implement a conservation program for this sub-species in the southeast Gobi where very few actions were conducted before. 

(Photo: Anne-Camille and Gansukh, citizen conservationist for GOVIIN KHULAN, in front of a Buddhist monastery located in the southeast Gobi and partner of our organization. Photo taken by Chaimjants G., young Buddhist monk and also citizen conservationist for GOVIIN KHULAN. September 2012). 

Our actions are mainly conducted in the southeast Gobi, in Mongolia (east of the Umnugobi and south of the Dornogobi aimags/provinces), where there were less actions towards this species protection.

Since the beginning, we collaborate with local scientists and specialists, local authorities, rangers, governors of each administrative subdivision, schools, Buddhist monasteries and the local population of our study area.

Since the summer 2008, we have secured support from some local rangers, local governments, some schools, two Buddhist monasteries and the local community of the south of the Dornogobi aimag.

Our program has built a multidisciplinary approach, is based on local communities’ involvement and local collaborations and takes into consideration Mongolian culture and traditions, for an optimal approach of this project and ensure its long term success. 

FAQ's